Write the Letter

Print

Objectives:

Children will attach meaning to scribbles.

Children will differentiate between writing and drawing.

Children will be able to identify letters from other shapes and symbols.

Children will be able recognize the shape of the letter.

Children will develop fine motor skills by tracing the letter.

Children will be able to read their own writing.

Children will be able to print the letter.

Instructions:

Before learning to write, it is important that children practice tracing and drawing with a pencil to gain basic pencil-control skills. These activities lead to the ability to form letters and numbers. Provide your child with opportunities to trace and draw in a fun and motivating format. Progressing from straight vertical lines to more challenging lines, such as curved, zigzag, and diagonal, EarTwiggle’s Pre-Writing Practice Workbook (16 pages) gives your child the opportunity to trace and draw in a fun and motivating format.

A short, soft pencil is easier for small children to hold. If your child is not yet accustomed to using a pencil, a crayon is a good starting tool.

Holding a pencil properly can be difficult for a child who does not yet have enough strength in his or her hands and fingers. Use these fine motor skill activities to help strenghten your child's hand and fingers.

Help your child use relaxed rather than cramped movements as he or she writes.

Demonstrate how to properly grip the pencil between the thumb and pointer finger, letting the pencil rest on the middle finger.

Teach this skill gradually so that your child retains interest and does not become overly tired. To help your child relax, have him or her shake the hands, make drawings in the air, or roll a piece of clay inside the hands.

Keep the writing lesson short—five to fifteen minutes is plenty of time for practice. Stretch the amount of pencil time by incorporating drawing and coloring.

Writing centers
Provide opportunities for children to practice writing letters of the alphabet, writing their names, and writing letters in isolation. 

Activities:

Writing the Letter—Introduction

The following examples are for the letter A. Adjust for all other letters of the alphabet.

Display the letter poster. Point to the lowercase letter.
This is how we write the small letter A. Do you remember which sound the letter A makes?
Let children make the sound. 

Point to the uppercase letter.
This is the capital letter A. This is how we write the large letter A. We use capital letters to begin names of people or places and at the beginning of sentences.

Ask children if they know anyone whose name begins with the letter A and the sound the letter makes (/ă/) (make letter sound).

Place a word wall picture for the letter A on the wall. Point to word.
This is how we write the word "ant." 
Point to the letter a at the beginning of the word. 
This is how we write the sound (/ă/) at the beginning of the word "ant."

Print This Activity

Pre-Writing Worksheets

The following examples are for the letter A. Adjust for all other letters of the alphabet.

Hand out the pre-writing worksheet for either the lowercase or uppercase letter A. Point out and describe the shape of the letter A. Let children trace the shape of the letter with their finger. Read the instructions and look at the picture.
What do we need to do? Yes, we need to help the airplane land on the letter A. "Airplane" begins with the /a/ sound. Can you hear it? /ă/ as in airplane.
Say the word together emphasizing the sound.

Let children practice writing the letter shape.

Print This Activity

Tracing Worksheets

The following examples are for the letter A. Adjust for all other letters of the alphabet.

Hand out the letter tracing worksheet.

Point to the lowercase letter.
This is how we write the small letter a. Do you remember which sound the letter a makes?
Say the letter sounds together: /ă/ as in ant and /ā/ as in apron.

Point to the uppercase letter.
This is the capital letter A. This is how we write the large letter A for the beginning of names of people or places or at the beginning of a sentence.

Ask children to practice writing the letters.

Print This Activity

Writing Worksheets

The following examples are for the letter A. Adjust for all other letters of the alphabet.

Hand out the letter writing worksheet.

Point to the lowercase letter.
This is how we write the small letter a. Do you remember which sound the letter a makes?
Point to pictures and emphasize the beginning sounds for each picture: /ă/ as in ant and /ā/ as in apron.

Point to the uppercase letter.
This is how we write the large letter A.

Point to the words.
This is how we write the word "ant." 
Point to the letter a at the beginning of the word.
This is how we write the sound (/ă/ ) at the beginning of the word "ant."
Ask children to practice writing the letters and words.

Both Block and D'Nealian handwriting worksheets are available.

Print This Activity